Robert Kraft’s Soliciting Sex Video Can’t Be Use In Court, Says Judge

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It is likely that Robert Kraft will win his legal battle.

Judge Leonard Hanser of Florida granted a motion to the owner of the New England Patriots to suppress video evidence related to his prostitution-request case Monday, according to Merris Badcock and Erik Altmann of WPTV and several other outlets. Hanser wrote the video illegally in his ruling police and did not do enough to protect the privacy of customers who were not suspected of prostitution.

Police say Kraft was caught in Jupiter, Fla., on Jan. 19 and Jan. 20 on videotape receiving sex acts in exchange for money at Asia Day Spa Orchids. Prosecutors charged him with two counts of solicitation for misdemeanors, with charges stemming from widespread prostitution and human trafficking sting targeting multiple Florida massage parlors. In a statement, Kraft apologized but denied any illegal activity.

Prosecutors hoped to use the video to win a conviction against Kraft and at least 25 other men charged with a petition. T.J. Quinn of ESPN believes that the ruling of the judge is torpedoing the case against Kraft.

For his involvement in the now infamous Florida prostitution sting, Kraft issued an apology in March, although this is by no means a legally binding admission of guilt. Kraft faces two counts of misdemeanor requesting for sex trafficking.

Despite admitting essentially guilt in his apology statement, Kraft allegedly will not accept a prosecutors plea deal. He is also facing potential discipline imposed by the NFL. The NFL can discipline him even if, according to league rules, he is not convicted in Florida.

He must admit that he would have been convicted to have dropped the two misdemeanor charges against him. That is the gist of the plea deal that he and others have been offered.

Besides having to make that admission “I would have been convicted if the charges were not dropped,” Kraft would have to complete a prostitution education course, perform 100 hours of community service, be screened for sexually transmitted diseases, and pay some court costs. And then there would disappear the two charges against him.