We are now two episodes into the second season of the Superman prequel series Krypton. What are your thoughts on the season thus far? Is the narrative going in the direction you expected?

Krypton Promotional Poster
Krypton Promotional Poster. Image Credit: IMDb.com

SPOILER ALERT: If you have not yet seen the latest episode of Krypton, stop reading now. There are spoilers ahead.

Screen Capture: A scene in the Marc Roskin directed Krypton episode “Ghost in the Fire.”
Screen Capture: A scene in the Marc Roskin directed Krypton episode “Ghost in the Fire.”

The opening pre-titles sequence sees two Sagitari pilots patrolling the Outlands of Krypton looking for Doomsday. No one has seen Doomsday for at least six and a half months. For a moment, it looks like something or someone landed on one of the patrol craft.

There is a flash of light and the craft crashes into the ice. The pilot in the other craft suddenly finds steering difficult. Someone is preventing her from keeping the craft in the sky. An exterior shot of the vehicle shows Doomsday clinging to the outside of the craft. With a single punch, Doomsday breaks through the craft’s protective window and takes down the second pilot. Cue opening titles…

On Wegthor…

The episode begins on Wegthor. Wegthor is one of Krypton’s moons. In the previous episode, ‘Light-Years from Home,’ we saw Val-El (Ian McElhinney) and Jax-Ur (Hannah Waddingham) leave Krypton for Wegthor. The moon is home base for the resistance. We now see the two Kryptonians arriving on the moon.

Screen Capture: Ian McElhinney as Val-El in the Marc Roskin directed Krypton episode “Ghost in the Fire.”
Screen Capture: Ian McElhinney as Val-El in the Marc Roskin directed Krypton episode “Ghost in the Fire.”

Many of Wegthor’s inhabitants reside under the moon’s surface in carved out subterranean caves. This is where the residence is hiding from General Zod (Colin Salmon) and the Sagitari.

“That b*st**d down there has stolen our better tomorrow,” Val-El said. “We’re stealing it back!”

Meanwhile, on Krypton…

Screen Capture: Georgina Campbell as Lyta-Zod in the Marc Roskin directed Krypton episode “Ghost in the Fire.”
Screen Capture: Georgina Campbell as Lyta-Zod in the Marc Roskin directed Krypton episode “Ghost in the Fire.”

Lyta-Zod (Georgina Campbell), not knowing Seg-El (Cameron Cuffe) is still alive and on Colu, is yearning over his loss. She stares into the eyes of the holographic Seg. Elsewhere, on Colu, Seg and Adam Strange (Shaun Sipos) are both chained to a tree.

On Colu…

On Colu, the bounty hunter Lobo (Emmett J Scanlan) looks to question Seg and Adam about the whereabouts of Brainiac (Blake Ritson). Lobo does not yet know the former physical representation of Brainiac is dead.

Screen Capture: Emmett J Scanlan as Lobo in the Marc Roskin directed Krypton episode “Ghost in the Fire.”
Screen Capture: Emmett J Scanlan as Lobo in the Marc Roskin directed Krypton episode “Ghost in the Fire.”

Lobo talks too much. Even though most of what he says is somewhat unintelligible, there must be some method to his madness. The character has an overly developed sense of self-importance. Consequently, because Seg has not an inkling as to the identity of this individual, Lobo is incensed by being unknown. Lobo must think he is “the scourge of the galaxy.”

Lobo Talks too Much…

“You’re in the presence of The Main Man … Come on … Assassin to Royalty? Scourge of the Cosmos? The last Czarnian? Ultimate Bastich? Machete Man, Mister Machete, Master Machete? Mister Frag, Master Frag? Archbishop of the First Celestial Church of the Triple Fish God? None of this is ringing a bell?” Lobo said to Seg. “Son of a bastich. Everyone knows who I am. WOW. Okay. The name’s Lobo.”

Screen Capture: Cameron Cuffe and Emmett J Scanlan as Seg-El and Lobo, respectively, in the Marc Roskin directed Krypton episode “Ghost in the Fire.” With his back facing the camera, on the opposite side of the tree, Shaun Sipos plays Adam Strange.
Screen Capture: Cameron Cuffe and Emmett J Scanlan as Seg-El and Lobo, respectively, in the Marc Roskin directed Krypton episode “Ghost in the Fire.” With the back of his head facing the camera, on the opposite side of the tree, Shaun Sipos plays Adam Strange.

Lobo takes Adam’s coughing as an indication he has heard of him. The bounty hunter is so busy self-aggrandising, it takes him forever to get around to talking about what he wants. Lobo is only interested in locating Brainiac.

Is Brainiac Dead?

When Seg tells Lobo he killed Brainiac, the bounty hunter does not initially believe the Kryptonian. Seg talks Lobo into going to the body.

Seg and Adam take Lobo to Brainiac’s body. While this is the shell of Brainiac’s physical host, Brainiac himself is not present. Brainiac is close by, inside Seg. The bottling alien must have transferred itself to Seg when he killed the physical body.

Later, Lobo starts talking about how Brainiac takes an entire city and places it inside a bottle. Think ship in a bottle but on a significantly larger scale. The bounty hunters incessant chatter must be driving Seg and Adam nuts.

Screen Capture: Blake Ritson as Brainiac in the Marc Roskin directed Krypton episode “Ghost in the Fire.”
Screen Capture: Blake Ritson as Brainiac in the Marc Roskin directed Krypton episode “Ghost in the Fire.”

On arrival at the body, Lobo finds the intelligence part of Brainiac is missing. Where could it be? While the physical embodiment of Brainiac is dead, the one we saw in the first season of the series and the second season premiere, the computer intelligence lives on in a new host. This is not a difficult concept to grasp. DC Comics fans will understand what this means.

If you have been paying attention to the figures Seg has been mentioning, both in distance and time, the numbers are “oddly specific.” How could Seg know the exact distance from Colu to Krypton in light-years? Lobo is not the only person that notices how specific Seg has been. Adam asks Seg how he could possibly know the distance. Seg doesn’t know.

Lobo finds Brainiac hiding in plain sight. He is in Seg. This explains how Seg knows the exact distance between Colu and Krypton.

Seg and Lobo go Head-to-Head…

Lobo is apparently surprised Brainiac choose Seg as his host. The bounty hunter suggests he would have selected ‘the hot blond.” The hot blond is Lobo’s reference to Adam. From the way Lobo has been talking about Adam, he is either gay, bisexual or even a sexual opportunist.

In addition to an extensively expanded intelligence, the Brainiac possessed Seg now has telekinetic telepathic powers. The later came as a surprise to both Seg and Adam. Even though Seg does possess a certain level of fighting skill, it might not be enough to defeat the bounty hunter in a straight one-to-one fight. Seg might need some assistance from a second party.

Screen Capture: Shaun Sipos as Adam Strange in the Marc Roskin directed Krypton episode “Ghost in the Fire.”
Screen Capture: Shaun Sipos as Adam Strange in the Marc Roskin directed Krypton episode “Ghost in the Fire.”

It looks like Lobo is about to beat Seg to death when Adam gets to the bounty hunter’s discarded weapon and blast a hole through his body. Unfortunately for Seg and Adam, Lobo possesses formidable biological regenerative powers which quickly returns the bounty hunter to full health.

Report Just In…  

Lyta informs her son, General Zod, Doomsday took out two of the Sagitari’s skimmers in the Outlands. Even though the general correctly observes bringing in Doomsday would be a challenge, Lyta does not like sending her people into suicide missions. To the general, these were acceptable losses.

Screen Capture: Georgina Campbell as Lyta-Zod in the Marc Roskin directed “Ghost in the Fire.”
Screen Capture: Georgina Campbell as Lyta-Zod in the Marc Roskin directed Krypton episode “Ghost in the Fire.”

The general’s mother wants to go to Wegthor to assess the abilities of the so-called Sagitari Zod deployed to take out the resistance. Instead of sending her to the moon, the general keeps his mother on Krypton where she can be more useful to him. Is there another reason for him keeping Lyta out of harm’s way? Relative to the timeline, the general has yet to be born.

The man that we see leading Krypton has travelled back in time from the future to reshape his past. From the way the Kryptonian glyph on Superman’s cape changed from the House of El to the House of Zod at the end of the first season, it looks like the general has already successfully changed some of the past to reflect the future he wants to create.

On the Surface of Wegthor…

Screen Capture: A scene in the Marc Roskin directed “Ghost in the Fire.”
Screen Capture: A scene in the Marc Roskin directed Krypton episode “Ghost in the Fire.”

Nyssa-Vex (Wallis Day) arrives on Wegthor. She has been sent to the moon to spy on the resistance. It does not take long for Nyssa to locate the resistance. She tells Jax and Val the general sent her to the moon so that she could be his eyes and ears on Wegthor. While Val understands Nyssa’s motivation, Jax is not pleased by the notion of having a spy in the camp. Because Zod has Cor-Vex, Nyssa had little choice but to comply with the demand.

Screen Capture: Wallis Day as Nyssa-Vex in the Marc Roskin directed “Ghost in the Fire.” With their backs facing the camera, Val-El and Jax-Ur are played by Ian McElhinney and Hannah Waddingham, respectively.
Screen Capture: Wallis Day as Nyssa-Vex in the Marc Roskin directed Krypton episode “Ghost in the Fire.” With their backs facing the camera, Val-El and Jax-Ur are played by Ian McElhinney and Hannah Waddingham, respectively.

When Jax questions where Nyssa came by such useful information, she reveals a Sagitari loyal to her father, even after his death, gave it to her. It came as a shock to Val to learn Daron-Vex (Elliot Cowan) is dead. Nyssa reveals Jax was right about the trap. The Sagitari used Daron to get to Cor. Once the Sagitari had no further use for Daron, Lyta murdered him in cold blood.

Even though Val seems to trust Nyssa, the came cannot be said for Jax. Jax intends to have Nyssa watched. When information comes back to Jax confirming Nyssa’s intelligence, it looks like there might be a fragment of trust between the two women developing. Would Jax be right to trust Nyssa? She did tell the resistance of Zod’s plan but was that Zod’s plan. Is it Zod’s plan to distract the resistance be giving them a big fish to fry?

Shortly after, Nyssa is seen communicating with the general. Is she working for both sides?

In the Outlands…

Jayna-Zod (Ann Ogbomo) is sat at a campfire with her brother, Vidar-Zod (Faisal Mohammed). Jayna must know she is hallucinating because Vidar has been dead for years. Jayna talks about the origin story for the Kryptonian God Roa. Was Jayna hallucinating when conversing with her brother or was it his spirit?

Later, Jayna thanks her brother for getting her as far as he did. She finds what she’s looking for in the Outlands. Because the bouncer (Antony Somers) recognises her as Jayna-Zod, she is not welcome in the Outlands. Jayna’s fighting skills come in handy. She proves to the bouncer she is not someone one should annoy without giving it careful thought. Taking out the bouncer only took two hits. Jayna hit the bouncer and the bouncer hit the floor. She only knocks him out.

Screen Capture: Ann Ogbomo as Jayna-Zod in the Marc Roskin directed “Ghost in the Fire.”
Screen Capture: Ann Ogbomo as Jayna-Zod in the Marc Roskin directed Krypton episode “Ghost in the Fire.”

Sagitari troops enter the Outland outpost looking for a traitor. The last person they expect to find there is Jayna-Zod. The bouncer glances up at the Sagitari and then over at Jayna. With athletic reflexes, Jayna takes out two of the three Sagitari in quick succession. The third one is killed by Dev-Em (Aaron Pierre).

In the Sagitari Training Room…

Lyta is training the Sagitari in the hopes they will become more like her. “We build our skills,” Lyta said. “We build our resolve.”

The general’s mother selects Lor-Ran (Toby-Alexander Smith) to spar with in front of the Sagitari-in-training. Lyta sees Seg in Lor. It throws her off her typical stride. It causes the instructor to fight harder because she believes Seg is dead. Consequently, because of her visions, Lyta kicks the hell out of Lor.