‘Something’ in Music 125

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music
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Something in music: origin 

One evening at a hot, trendy L.A. nightclub on a rare solo outing, yours truly found himself standing alone at the bar preparing to review the upcoming act. Before he had taken more than a few notes, however, he was bookended by a pair of vivacious vixens who insisted on engaging your rockin’ writer in cozy conversation. Strangely, the subject of “marriage” arose.

One of the young ladies noted that when a gal is about to get hitched she needs “something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue.” Your provocative penman was immediately inspired. After all, those very same terms could be applied to music too: “Something old” or classic, “something new” or recently released, “something borrowed”, a cover, and “something blue”, a blues song or a song with “blue” in the title.  The rest is history.

Something Old

Our “something old” this edition is the classic cut “Hotel California” by the American rock band The Eagles. It’s the title track of their famous 1977 platter. It was co-written by members Don Felder, Glenn Frey, and Don Henley. The original recording features Henley on lead vocals.

Something New

Our “something new” this edition is the stunning, new single “Monsters” by Austin, Texas-based singer/songwriter, and musician, Nichole Wagner. This stark, effective track will also be included on her upcoming album due out next year. Wagner is backed by Abram Shook on bass, Matthew Shook on drums, Justin Douglas on guitar, and Jana Horn providing background vocals. This noteworthy, memorable music video was directed by Jacob Stone.

Something Borrowed 

Our “something borrowed” this time is the song “I Heard It Through the Grapevine.” It was written by American songwriter Norman Whitfield. The song was first recorded by Gladys Knight & the Pips. This instrumental audio adaptation is by trumpeter Mike Cottone. It is included on his 2020 disc titled Thank You

Something Blue 

Finally, our “something blue” this time is the blues standard “Forty Four Blue”, or “44.” This blues bit harkens back to the state of Louisiana in the early 1920s. It was American bluesman Roosevelt Sykes who actually put lyrics to the tune and first recorded it sometime in 1929.  

Image courtesy of Pinterest

Did we mention your favorite “something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue”? If not, let us know. Don’t forget to send us your sexy or funny bride photos too!